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The Cholesterol-Beating Supplement Big Pharma Doesn’t Want You to Know About

More Americans take statins than any other prescription drug.

This is because Big Pharma relentlessly pushes them. They spend $5 billion a year on advertising, $3.5 billion on payments to doctors, and $350 million lobbying politicians.[1]

The number of people taking statins has soared by 50% in just the last 15 years. Today, nearly a third of Americans over 40 are taking one or more of these cholesterol-lowering drugs.[2]

This is true even though study after study shows statins have little benefit for the vast majority of people who take them. And they are linked to serious side effects such as memory loss, muscle pain, and diabetes.[3]

What would happen if there was a safe, natural supplement that lowered cholesterol as well as statins? Big Pharma would lose a big chunk of the $1 trillion (yes, that’s trillion with a “t”) in revenues they make every year from the drug.[4]

That’s why they don’t want you to know about red yeast rice (RYR).

RYR is rice fermented with Monascus purpureus yeast. It’s been an important traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of years.

Science shows RYR does what statins are supposed to do and more, but without serious side effects. Let’s consider the research:

A study published in The American Journal of Cardiology looked at 25 people who couldn’t tolerate statins due to stomach upset and other side effects. After taking RYR for a month, their total cholesterol dropped 15% while “bad” LDL cholesterol dropped 21%. RYR caused no side effects.[5]

Researchers from Taiwan’s China Medical University Hospital gave 79 people with high cholesterol either RYR or a placebo for eight weeks. The RYR group had significantly greater reduction in LDL and total cholesterol.[6]

An overview of the medical literature from researchers at Rutgers University and Winthrop University Hospital found that RYR lowers triglycerides and raises “good” HDL cholesterol.[7]

And another study in The American Journal of Cardiology looked at 5,000 heart attack patients. Researchers found that RYR reduced their triglycerides and LDL, lowered their death rate by a third, and cut their risk of another heart attack in half.[8]

RYR also:

  • Reduces inflammation. Chronic inflammation is strongly linked to heart disease.[9] 

    Research published in the journal Trials looked at 50 subjects. Scientists randomly gave the subjects either RYR and olive oil or a placebo. After eight weeks, the patients’ oxidative stress levels fell by up to 20%. Oxidative stress is a key cause of inflammation.[10]

  • Fights diabetes. A study from Italy’s Federico II University Department of Clinical Medicine tested RYR supplements in people with metabolic syndrome, a condition characterized by elevated blood sugar and a high risk for a heart attack. The researchers randomly gave the subjects a supplement with RYR or a placebo. After 18 weeks, the RYR group had a significant decrease in insulin resistance.[11]

RYR can cause mild side effects in some people…mainly gas and stomach distress. Rarely, it can cause liver toxicity and allergic reactions. Because of this, make sure to stick with the dosage recommended on the label.

You should consult your doctor before you take RYR. It can interact with statins. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding shouldn’t take it.

RYR supplements are available from online retailers, drugstores, and health food stores.

You always have more options than Big Pharma would have you think. red yeast rice is a prime example.

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[1]https://www.michaelwest.com.au/big-pharma-give-us-data-well-give-unvarnished-truth

[2]htttps://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db177.pdf

[3]https://www.institutefornaturalhealing.com/2018/04/americans-ever-take-statins-heart-disease-epidemic-keeps-growing

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29353811

[5]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20185013

[6]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17568245

[7]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2697909/#__ffn_sectitle

[8]https://www.ajconline.org/article/S0002-9149(08)00353-6/fulltext

[9]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3492709/

[10]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5496259/

[11]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22451856